The Search

And in the end we find it,

what we’re looking for . . .

if we find what we’re looking for

is what we’ve found . . .

looking for what we wanted to find.

 

The search, the journey,

the process . . . we all know the story,

and we all know it’s true—

what we’re looking for

is the distraction we need

because we know, really,

there’s only one way to know,

only one scenario where we find it

and drink from the grail.

 

Yet we look, we search the leafy shade

dappling the board fence;

the cat’s tail dancing as it sleeps

in the window sill; the child’s

sobby-song burbling out

on a toddle-trot-&-stumble

away from the dog’s tongue,

arms up, tears sprinkling the ground.

 

We know when we go slow, look close,

savor the sweetness and the pain,

we can find it, what’s there—

because every moment is a quest,

every taste is what we get,

and sometimes it’s less than we hoped for—

and sometimes it’s more, way more

than we can swallow. Sometimes

it’s more than we ever dreamed.

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One Response to The Search

  1. Adam says:

    Shalom could very well be. My parents magenad to raise me in a total atheist bubble. I really DID grow up with no faith, no need for faith, no realization that faith existed as an important factor for other people.All the Jewish holidays etc. were celebrated but as fun social things that had pretty stories in them you know, like the Greek and Norse mythologies have really pretty stories, and like all the fairy tales I like so much.I was taught that there are funny people in the world who believe in gods, and magic, and superstition, and such and we don’t mock them because it’s rude .but I really did grow up without feeling that I was non-religious. I just WAS. the culture I accumulated was about books, and history, and music, and pop culture, and had nothing to do with what other people thought about fairies.

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